Saturday Songwriting: Lost on the Air

Last week, we talked about weaving 7th chords. This week, I want to share a really cool sounding progression that uses some of those 7th chords. And because we did the work last week of learning how to weave those chords, you’ll have a chance to really see how this progression fits together: one note simply descends of fret at a time in each chord, sort of like walking down a stairway. 

This is known as a “line cliché” in music theory.   

You don’t have to remember that, but if you google it you’ll find a whole bunch of other chord changes like the one here today. (I’ll likely explore others sometime in the next few months).      

The Prompt:

Here’s a link to Virginia Mori’s Art

The Musical Idea:

Here’s a downloadable pdf of the worksheet above:

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Saturday Songwriting: Stealing Pears

Seventh chords are a lot like regular chords, but with a little extra something. That “something” that might be described as tension, intrigue, or mystery. I found them a bit intimidating when I was first learning guitar. They seemed complicated. Advanced. Beyond my understanding. 

But they’re not really. They are simply another color to add to your available palette of sounds.  

This weeks musical idea talks about how 7th chords are woven together and where the different kinds of sevenths come from. For the most part 7th chords follow the principles of BEAD Guides Chord Flow

If a 7th chord is called major or minor you can treat it in much the same way any other major or minor chord is treated with BEAD Guides Chord Flow

If it’s merely called a 7 chord, (like G7 for instance), that chord works like a one way sign towards the neighboring letter on it’s right. In G7’s case, C.   

I often think of these chords as pointer chords, they point emphatically towards the neighbor on their right. (They’re called dominant 7s in classic music theory which speaks to their dominant sonic push in that direction). But you could choose to go somewhere else and leave the tension created by it just hanging.   

Finally, there’s the minor 7 flat 5 chord, (also called a half diminished chord). The name is a little involved but ignore that and remember it’s a juiced up diminished chord which likes to move one fret up the fret fretboard the same way other diminished chords do.   

That’s pretty much it. Are there other ways to use and play with 7 chords? Absolutely. But following the principles of BEAD Guides Chord Flow with them is a great place to start. If you haven’t tried playing around with 7th chords before, give one or two a try.   

The Prompt:

Here’s a link to Piia Lehti’s Art

The Musical Idea:

Here’s a downloadable pdf of the worksheet above:

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Saturday Songwriting: Scrape the Sun

The three major chords in a scale are amazing. I feel like I overlook them sometimes. I want to do more than write just another three chord song. But a solid melody and three chords is more than enough to write a great song.  

This week’s musical idea is taking a look at a connection between the three major chords and the scale they come from, which is that those three chords together hold all the notes of the major scale. That means any melody that sticks to a major scale could be harmonize with just those three chords.   

I was blown away the first time I heard that. I still kind of am.  

 

The Prompt:

Here’s a link to Christopher Bucklow’s Art

The Musical Idea:

Here’s a downloadable pdf of the worksheet above:

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Saturday Songwriting: Caged Lioness

A few days ago, I was checking out Jake Lizzio’s video (from Signals Music Studio) looking at the chord progression of Bruno Mars’s “When I Was Your Man.” It’s a cool video, and the song has some great changes to explore. And like pretty much all music theory, it can be a little intimidating if you don’t know the jargon.   The cool thing is, BEAD Guides Chord Flow can show the principles guiding the song, no jargon needed.  

The Prompt:

Here’s a link to Stefano Bonazzi’s Art

The Musical Idea:

Jake Lizzio explains “When I Was Your Man.”

Here’s a downloadable pdf of the worksheet above:

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Saturday Songwriting: It’s Shadow Shall Appear

Today is Halloween. This week, I figured I’d share something scary–or at least potentially spooky–and focus in on chords in a minor scale. Not merely a minor scale, but the A minor scale and how to find the chords in it, and play around with them.  

Minor scales are notoriously unstable, and there are lots of different ways for a scale to be minor, while there is basically only one major scale. The plus side of the variety and instability of minor scales is that tons of different chords and substitutions will sound “good” in minor scales. (The definition of good here is dependent entirely on the amount of dissonance you can bear). 

I’ve included a worksheet below so you can create lots of different progressions and see what they sound like.   

The Prompt:

Here’s a link to Pitch Canker’s Art

The Musical Idea:

Here’s a downloadable pdf of the worksheet above:

Here’s a downloadable pdf of the worksheet above:

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